Tag: btc.com

Bitmain Releases AntSentry International Version, Making Mining Easier

Bitmain today launched the international version of AntSentry – a cloud-based operation and maintenance management system. Earlier this year, the Chinese version of it was launched at Bitmain’s annual mining summit in Sanya and has gained positive feedback. The AntSentry platform provides comprehensive management support services, including real-time miner monitoring, batch operation, automatic operation and maintenance, profit analysis, safety protection, and digital operation. The international version now brings all the functions to customers around the world.

AntSentry aims to provide an easier and more accessible approach to customers by making mining easier. With that in mind, AntSentry was designed to support almost all mainstream mining hardware models including Antminer, Whatsminer, Avalonminer, and Innosilicon, and is compatible with BTC.comAntPool, HuobiPool, F2Pool, Poolin among other mining pools. Up until now, AntSentry has access to more than 50 data centers and manages more than 500,000 miners, and is still growing.

AntSentry: Capabilities

“The company has attracted many Chinese miners and has gained strong momentum. Customers have given us very positive feedback, they have seen a strong improvement of operational efficiency and successfully reduced operation and maintenance costs with more efficient overall monitoring and management. AntSentry’s performance spoke for itself.” said Bob Liang, Business Line Leader of AntSentry.

AntSentry showcases new advanced features: One-click management for the top ten most frequent failures, batch execution for eight most common operation procedures, automatic intelligent operation and maintenance, security protection, and statistics center.

AntSentry: One-click Troubleshooting

Users in China have spoken very highly of AntSentry. It has truly made mining easier with real-time effective monitoring of offline mining data, miner failures, and mining pool allocations. The AntSentry management system can analyze data centers’ quantitative data to generate efficient mining solutions.

AntSentry: Common Operation Procedures

AntSentry’s international version is now being deployed globally, growing its presence especially in Europe, Western Asia, the United States. As the functions of AntSentry improve, it helps miners and data centers gain a significant competitive advantage in the global market, and will keep growing into a strong tool for the entire cryptocurrency mining industry.

---------------------
Liked this article? Share it with others:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin
Follow Us for Latest News & Articles:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin

The story behind the ASIC evolution

When Bitcoin mining first started in 2009, it was considered a niche hobby for cryptocurrency enthusiasts. Since then, it’s grown into a billion-dollar industry – with Bitmain leading this growth since 2013.

Bitmain’s entrance into the mining market in 2013 saw the emergence of the ‘ASIC era’, as the company sought to bring ASICs to the masses. Specifically designed to mine cryptocurrencies, the demand for ASICs has since continued to grow alongside the advancement of the bitcoin mining industry.

BTC mining: from hobby to global industry

Back in 2009, the only hardware needed to mine Bitcoin was a simple home computer (provided it had reasonable specifications). These computers would run standard multi-core CPUs, which would produce BTC at a rate of 50 per block. This would equate to a few dollars of profit per day.

Fast forward ten years and Bitcoin mining generated five billion U.S. dollars in revenue in 2019. Despite industry growth volatility, these figures suggested an overall increased demand for bitcoin miners.

These demands first accelerated in October 2010, when the code for mining bitcoin with GPUs was released to the general public. Although the public was able to mine bitcoin for themselves, it quickly became evident that it was still not easy for GPU users to scale hash rates. So, it was only once FPGAs were introduced that mining really began to scale, as FPGAs are more power-efficient than GPUs.

By 2012, the mining industry was advanced even further with the adoption of ASIC technology. These miners were carefully designed for the specific use of mining cryptocurrencies, replacing the need to tweak the field-programmable component of FPGAs after purchase. As there will always be a need and approach to making a specific computation more efficient, ASICs were a natural progression in the Bitcoin mining industry.

Antminer is born

By November 2013, Bitmain introduced its very own ASIC: the Antminer S1, which had a hash rate of 180 GH/s. Just a few months later, the Antminer S2 model was released, with a significantly higher hash rate of 1 TH/s.

Bitmain’s ASICs were quickly getting more powerful, and more energy-efficient over time.

Antminer S1: Launched 2013

Rapid rise of Antminers as BTC makes history

Over the next few years between 2014 and 2019, Bitmain released numerous Antminer models to the market. In 2014 alone, Bitmain released miners such as the Antminer S2, S3, S4, and S5 – all with the aim of providing more efficient and profitable hardware to miners in order to keep up with the demands of the growing bitcoin mining industry.

On top of this, Bitmain launched the AntPool mining pool in 2014, further highlighting Bitmain’s commitment to helping decentralize the bitcoin network and put the majority of hashing power into the hands of consumers. This commitment was further highlighted in Bitmain’s 2015 launch of BTC.com, which introduced the top-leading blockchain explorer that efficiently offered users all information on the network. By 2016, BTC.com also launched its own pool platform.

With BTC making its historic price run in 2017, Bitmain continued to release batch variations of the S9 as well as entirely new models, such as the Antminer T9 which had a hash rate of 11.5 TH/s.

As the Bitcoin market continued to grow, Bitmain released 8 SHA256 models throughout 2018.

As the Bitcoin market continued to grow, Bitmain released the Antminer S15 in 2018, which was launched at the World Digital Mining Summit. The Antminer S15 provided long-term energy efficiency through its use of Bitmain’s 7nm chip that integrates over 1 billion transistors per unit.

By 2019, Bitmain had introduced its most popular Antminer models to date: the Antminer 17 Series.

Antminer Design Advancements

Antminers and the future of mining …

Since 2013, Bitmain has shown commitment to developing new technologies that overcome the new challenges of mining – and the significance of Bitmain’s advancements makes them leaders by example in the field.

Today, Bitmain continues to pursue its vision of bringing the future of mining to all. And that is why Bitmain has released the Antminer S19 and Antminer S19 Pro models, featuring hash rates of 95 TH/s and 110 TH/s respectively. The Antminer S19 series represents the evolution of Bitcoin mining, from the very first Antminer S1 to the ever-popular Antminer S9, reaching the present-day Antminer S19. The mining community has taken great leaps of development.

New Genenration Antminer S19 and S19 Pro
---------------------
Liked this article? Share it with others:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin
Follow Us for Latest News & Articles:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin

Stuck With an “Unconfirmed” Bitcoin Transaction? This May Help Next Time.

The number of transactions on the Bitcoin network has steadily increased over the years. This means more blocks are filling up. And as not all transactions can be included in the blockchain straight away, backlogs form in miners’ “mempools” (a sort of “transaction queue.”)

Miners typically pick the transactions that pay the most fees and include these in their blocks first. Transactions that include lower fees are “outbid” on the so called “fee market,” and remain in miners’ mempools until a new block is found. If the transaction is outbid again, it has to wait until the next block.

This can lead to a suboptimal user experience. Transactions with too low a fee can take hours or even days to confirm, and sometimes never confirm at all.

But here is what you can do today to keep your own transaction from getting stuck.

Before You Send It

For the first years of Bitcoin’s existence, most wallets added fixed fees to outgoing transactions: typically, 0.1 mBTC. Since miners had spare space in their blocks anyways, they normally included these transactions in the first block they mined. (In fact, transactions with lower fees or even no fee at all were often included as well.)

With the increased competition for block space, a fixed 0.1 mBTC fee is often insufficient to have a transaction included in the next block; it gets outbid by transactions that include higher fees. While even a low fee transaction will probably confirm eventually, it can take a while.

Try increasing the fee

If you want to have your transaction confirmed faster, the obvious solution is to include a higher fee.

If your wallet (by default) includes an insufficient fee, you may be able to adjust the fee manually, either as part of the wallet settings, or when you send a transaction. (Or both.)

Websites like 21.co monitor the network and suggest how much of a fee you should include per byte, as well as how fast you can expect your transactions to confirm at different fee levels.

If you need the payment to go through in the next block or two, you need to pay a higher fee. For less urgent payments, you can include a lower fee; it will just take a bit longer to confirm.

Check if your wallet includes dynamic fees

These days, most wallets support dynamic fees. Based on data from the Bitcoin network, these wallets automatically include a fee that is estimated to have a transaction included in the next block, or maybe in one of the first blocks after that.

Some wallets also let you choose the fee priority. Again, higher fees let your transactions confirm faster, lower fees could make it take a bit longer.

If transactions from your wallet are often delayed during peak hours, and you have no option to adjust to higher priority fees, your wallet is most likely outdated. Check if there is an update available, or switch to a new wallet.

Consider switching wallets

If you do switch to a new wallet, you of course need to transfer funds from your old wallet to your new wallet. If you’re not in a rush and don’t mind paying the fee, you can just send it from your old wallet to the new wallet through the Bitcoin network. It will probably arrive eventually — even if the fee is low.

If you are in a rush, some wallets allow you to export your private keys or the private key seed, and then import them into the new wallet. This requires no transaction on the Bitcoin network. From the new wallet, you can immediately start transacting.

After You’ve Sent It

If you’ve already sent a transaction and it gets stuck, that transaction can, in some cases, be made to “jump the queue.”

Opt-in Replace-by-fee

The easiest way to make your transaction jump the queue is using an option called Opt-In Replace-by-Fee (Opt-In RBF). This lets you re-send the same transaction, but with a higher fee.

In most cases, when the same transaction is re-sent over the network, but with a higher fee, the new transaction is rejected by the network. Bitcoin nodes typically consider this new transaction a double spend, and will therefore not accept or relay it.

But when sending a transaction using Opt-In RBF, you essentially tell the network you may re-send that same transaction later on, but with a higher fee. As a result, most Bitcoin nodes will accept the new transaction in favor of the older one; allowing the new transaction to jump the queue.

Whether your new transaction will be included in the very next block doesdepend on which miner mines that next block: not all miners support Opt-In RBF. However, enough miners support the option to, in all likelihood, have your transaction included in one of the next couple blocks.

Opt-In RBF is currently supported by two wallets: Electrum and GreenAddress. Depending on the wallet, you may need to enable Opt-In RBF in the settings menu before you send the (first) transaction.

Child Pays for Parent

If your wallet does not support Opt-In RBF, things get a bit more complex.

Child Pays for Parent (CPFP) may do the trick. Applying CPFP, miners don’t necessarily pick the transactions that include the most fees, but instead pick a set of transactions that include most combined fees.

Without getting into too many technical details, most outgoing transactions do not only send bitcoins to the receiver, but they also send “change” back to you. You can spend this change in a next transaction.

Some wallets let you spend this change even while it is still unconfirmed, so you can send this change to yourself in a new transaction. This time, make sure to include a high enough fee to compensate for the original low fee transaction. A miner should pick up the whole set of transactions and confirm them all at once.

If your wallet does not let you select which bitcoins to spend exactly — meaning you cannot specifically spend the unconfirmed change — you can try spending allfunds in the wallet to yourself; this should include the change.

Like Opt-In RBF, not all miners currently support CPFP. But enough of them do to probably have your transaction confirmed in one of the next blocks.

Or…

If neither Opt-In RBF nor CPFP are an option, you can technically still try and transmit the original transaction with a higher fee. This is typically referred to as “full replace-by-fee,” which some miners accept. However, publicly available wallets currently do not support this as an option.

Otherwise, you may just have to wait either until the transaction confirms or until the bitcoins reappear in your wallet. It’s important to note that until a transaction confirms, the bitcoins are technically still in your wallet — it’s just that it often doesn’t appear that way. The bitcoins are not literally “stuck” on the network and cannot get lost.

As the Receiver

Of course, a transaction can also get stuck if you’re on the receiving end of it.

If your wallet allows spending unconfirmed transactions, this can be solved with CPFP as well. Much like as mentioned before, you can re-spend the unconfirmed, incoming bitcoins to yourself, including a fee high enough to compensate for the initial low fee transaction. If the new fee is sufficient, the transaction should typically confirm within a couple of blocks.

The only other option is to ask the sender whether he used Opt-In RBF. If so, he can re-send the transaction with a higher fee.

Written by Aaron van Wirdum for The Bitcoin Magazine | Original article: https://bitcoinmag….

Note: BTC.COM has a real-time transaction fee tracker too. The BTC.COM wallet will soon have the RBF option too.---------------------
Liked this article? Share it with others:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin
Follow Us for Latest News & Articles:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin

Weekly News Roundup – 28 October 2016

Today is Bitmain’s third anniversary and celebrations are underway at the Bitmain headquarters in Beijing while I start to round up some noteworthy bitcoin news of the past two weeks.

Bitcoin price crosses $700

Bitcoin price continued to flaunt its mojo since our previous bitcoin news’ roundup  and crossed the $700 mark by the time of publishing this (29 October). This is the highest it has risen since 21 June 2016.
The strongest factor in this rise seems to be the devaluation of the Chinese Yuan. The graph below from a Bloomberg article shows an inverse relationship between the price of Chinese Yuan and that of Bitcoin.

bitcoin news roundup - Yuan Bitcoin Inverse relationship

Chinese currency’s weakness is boosting bitcoin demand.                                                Image courtesy: Bloomberg

MGT Capital Investments partners with Bitmain

On Wednesday, news that MGT Capital Investments, Inc. (OTC: MGTI) has signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) to form a joint venture with Bitmain became public with MGTI’s press release.
The proposed joint venture is expected to result in the development of a Bitcoin mining pool that will include advanced user interface as well as superior network protection and security maintained by MGT’s proprietary cybersecurity technologies. In addition, the companies plan to form a partnership to offer businesses and consumers affordably priced cloud mining contracts.

Bitmain’s BTC.com organizes the biggest conference for owners and operators of “mining farms” 

On 22 October, Bitmain’s BTC.com held the first-ever conference for “mining farm” owners and operators in Chengdu, China. Kevin Pan of BTC.com introduced some unique aspects of its BTC.com mining pool while Chris Zhu of BTC.com explained how miners protect the bitcoin network. Further description of the event is on BTC.com’s blog post.

bitcoin news roundup - BTC.com's Kevin Pan at the miners' conference in Chengdu, China

Kevin Pan of BTC.com at the miners’ conference in Chengdu

Hillary’s campaign team calls Bitcoin a “libertarian Ayn Rand schtick”

An email exchange published by WikiLeaks in which the Democrat presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta commented on bitcoin saw the media’s spotlight on 18 October. The email thread was started by Stan Stalnaker, founding director and chief strategy officer of the digital currency “Ven”, to propose Ven for use by Hillary’s campaign after meeting with Podesta at a Hillary fundraiser in London.
Podesta forwarded the email to campaign tech aide Teddy Goff with an explanation: “I don’t send all the crazy ideas I hear about at fundraisers your way, but this seems interesting and legit. Essentially digital currency with a green angle as opposed to bitcoin’s libertarian Ayn Rand schtick. Would you get some members of your team to meet with Stan when he’s in NYC later this month to see if it’s worth a real conversation?”---------------------
Liked this article? Share it with others:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin
Follow Us for Latest News & Articles:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin

Weekly News Roundup – 23 September 2016

On Fridays, beginning today, we will be rounding up some breaking news of the past week from the bitcoin/cryptocurrency space. This past week we saw:

the Devcon2 in Shanghai

Several heavyweights from the global cryptocurrency space descended on Shanghai for the Devcon2.  Here are some informative news articles intended to give you some of the experience.

At Ethereum Mega-Event, the ‘Church of Vitalik’ Sobers Up , How Zcash ‘Project Alchemy’ connects with Ethereum , Ethereum Mist and how to build apps that are truly unstoppable , Ethereum Devs Applaud the Audience at Devcon’s Closing

a US federal judge rule that Bitcoin is a currency

Anthony Murgio, of Coin.mx, who was indicted on alleged money laundering charges in July of last year, had sought to dismiss two of the charges against him in part by arguing that bitcoins don’t count as “funds” in the context of US law. This was rejected by the judge Alison Nathan, who wrote in her ruling that: “Bitcoins are funds within the plain meaning of that term. Bitcoins can be accepted as a payment for goods and services or bought directly from an exchange with a bank account. They therefore function as pecuniary resources and are used as a medium of exchange and a means of payment.”  Read more…

Bitcoin.com’s new mining pool mine its first block

Bitcoin.com’s new mining pool, which uses the Bitcoin Unlimited protocol, mined its first block. Bitcoin Unlimited is an alternative protocol that removes transaction block size limits from the protocol level and adds it to the transport level. This means those running the software can choose the size they like. Read more…

BTC.COM’s new mining pool make it to the list of global top ten poolsBitcoin Mining Pool Distribution 23 September 2016 BTC.com

The new open-source pool by BTC.com a place on the list of the top ten mining pools. According to pool distribution statistics from BTC.COM’s free block explorer and statistics website, BTC.COM’s new pool, at time of writing, accounted for 2.9% of the bitcoin network’s hashrate. Read more…

Gemini conduct Bitcoin’s first-ever daily auction on an exchange

The Winklevoss twins’  bitcoin exchange held the first-ever daily auction for Bitcoin on their digital currency exchange Gemini Trust Co. Read more… ---------------------
Liked this article? Share it with others:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin
Follow Us for Latest News & Articles:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin

BTC.com Launches New Open-source Mining Pool with Zero Mining Fee!

Bitmain’s BTC.com, the free bitcoin block explorer, analytics tool and bitcoin wallet, has launched an open-source bitcoin mining pool and is charging no mining fee until 2017.

With the launch of this open-source mining pool, the BTC.com team hopes to set new technical standards for mining pools and remove barriers that limit the efficiency or ease of mining pools.

To ensure stability and efficiency, the BTC.com mining pool has been tested for upto 180,000 miners (or workers) by using software simulators that replicate the load of real workers. If each worker is assumed to have the hashrate of an Antminer S9, that would make the total hashrate of this simulation more than that of the entire bitcoin network.

The BTC.com pool has many firsts for any mining pool:

  1. A “PoolWatcher” function to “listen” to other mining pools for newfound blocks and starts mining at the next height after a block has been found on any pool. This reduces the number of orphaned blocks and increases the productivity of the pool.
  2. A “BtcAgent” software that allows mining farm owners or miners with multiple workers to view every worker in their LAN on the mining pool. This software can be downloaded from GitHub, like the rest of the BTC.com mining pool source code.
  3. Users can see the real-time stats on the pool immediately after connecting their worker. This eliminates the long wait to see the stats of your new worker on the mining pool.
  4. Payouts are calculated almost instantly.

To reduce latency of newly mined blocks and increase robustness, the BTC.com mining pool has independent server clusters in China and USA with more clusters planned for Europe and North America.

btccom launches new mining pool

I accessed this website from within China so it was automatically redirected to the China server cluster. For users accessing the new pool website from outside China, the hashrate shown will be significantly lower.

The BTC.com mining pool has a full-feature mobile app available for download from App Store as well as Google Play store. This app also allows users to manage their miners by creating groups, deleting inactive miners and sorting their miners.

Besides zero mining fee until 2017, BTC.com is also offering a 1% subsidy to every new user within first 3 months of its launch, provided the user maintains his/her hashrate for at least one month.

The BTC.com pool will offer rewards based on pay-per-share (PPS) and, after 31 December 2016, charge a fee of 1.5%, among the lowest in the industry.

Bitmain hopes that the open-source BTC.COM mining pool will set new benchmarks in terms of stability, efficiency and service for all mining pools and, by helping other developers around the world to develop mining pools using BTC.COM’s source code, further promote decentralization of the bitcoin mining network.

The pool website is pool.btc.com and the source code is available on GitHub at: https://github.com/btccom/btcpool---------------------
Liked this article? Share it with others:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin
Follow Us for Latest News & Articles:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin

Blockchain Education Network to Host Global Bitcoin Airdrop

BTC.com organize bitcoin airdrop

This September, blockchain hubs across North America will be giving out bitcoin to begin the next school year. Over a dozen regions including New York, San Francisco, Chicago and Boston in the United States and Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver and Ottawa, in Canada, are preparing their events. The giveaway, known as a Bitcoin Airdrop, has become a yearly tradition on university campuses.

The bits are to be given to students who come out to their local blockchain club’s first meeting. Students will also be introduced to concepts about bitcoin and the blockchain through their peers and a demonstration of a wallet creation and transfer.

History of the Airdrop

The first airdrop was hosted in 2014 by the MIT Bitcoin Club, after the club raised $500,000 worth of bitcoin to give to each incoming freshman. The event was then replicated in 2015 in Montreal by the McGill Cryptocurrency Club during their school’s frosh week, with donations given to the club. The Blockchain Education Network is now expanding the initiative throughout their network of regional hubs.

Why an Airdrop?

An airdrop allows people who would otherwise never have heard about bitcoin to try out using their first bits with their friends in a setting where their questions can be answered. Even if a student downloads a wallet and sells the bitcoin, they discover how easily it can be exchanged for fiat currency and would be more open to receiving bitcoin as payment at a future time.

Focus on Education

The Blockchain Education Network (BEN) believes that the blockchain revolution must happen through education. Most people are still unfamiliar with what digital currencies and the blockchain are, though almost everyone is curious when they first hear about it and want to learn more.

Bitcoin and blockchains are technologies with broad socio-economic impacts, which means that different parts of the world will have a different perspectives on it. BEN organizes as a swarm, a decentralized organizational model, to ensure that the education presented at each meeting is relatable to the region.

A Crucial Grassroots Movement for Students

BEN is comprised primarily of students aged 18-25 and the group believes that it is especially important for this demographic to be able to experiment with these technologies. The world is quickly moving into a sharing economy where people can operate remotely and companies have access to a global talent pool. Students will all enter the workforce after graduating and must be familiar with new technology.

Each year, the leadership from a university club graduates and must be replaced by the incoming class of students. Doing an airdrop at the beginning of each school year ensures a strong interest in blockchain technology and many new students joining the blockchain community in every region that participates.

In addition to the airdrop, BEN has an entire Fall 2016 initiative to bring new students into the blockchain ecosystem including a Blockchain Olympics event in October and a Blockchain Startup Gauntlet in November. BEN also hosts and promotes hackathons for students with a variety of skill sets, and assists students who are interested in attending bitcoin and blockchain conferences.

Future Implications

This initiative has become a tradition that can scale as wide as its reach. 500 students receiving bitcoin this September may not change the world; however, each year showing a new group of motivated university students how this technology works may cause a ripple effect of education that reaches farther than our expectations.

In our view, the “blockchain revolution” isn’t so far fetched. This is a technology which better maps to our worldviews after having grown up with the internet. It has taken 25 years for the internet to move from creation to our pockets. Through this historical lens, we see any current shortcomings of blockchain as an opportunity for our generation to solve.

Written by Michael Gord for the Bitcoin Magazine | Original article: https://bitcoinmag….---------------------
Liked this article? Share it with others:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin
Follow Us for Latest News & Articles:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin

Bitmain has Acquired Blocktrail

 

We are pleased to inform you that Bitmain has acquired Amsterdam-based Blocktrail B.V., the company behind the Blocktrail bitcoin wallet.

In addition to the popular bitcoin wallet, Blocktrail is well known in the bitcoin space for its developers API and its block explorer. As part of the acquisition, Blocktrail’s products, services and team will gradually be merged into BTC.com

With this acquisition, we will continue providing even better products and services to users of Bitmain and all its businesses.

Thank you for your continuous support.

 

Sincerely,

The Bitmain team---------------------
Liked this article? Share it with others:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin
Follow Us for Latest News & Articles:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedin

© 2022 blog.bitmain.com

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑